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Africa • Risks • 6/16

Governments and Telecoms Top Targeted Sectors for Cyber Attacks in East Africa

Cyber breaches are not confined to developed markets

In East Africa, governments are the top target sector for cyber attacks (33%). Telecommunications (22%) and financial services (17%) follow in close succession. Contrary to the perception that cyber breaches are a problem unique to the large multinational companies based in developed markets, East African organisations are fast becoming a target for attacks with local subsidiaries particularly attractive as the ‘cyber’ route into these multinationals.

According to Control Risks’ cyber threat intelligence team:

Patrick Matu, Compliance, Forensics and Cyber expert for East Africa comments: “Despite a growing number of media headlines about US or EU based companies falling victim to a cyber breach, the lack of obligation in many emerging markets to report on incidents is creating a false illusion that businesses operating in these markets are not subject to cyber attacks.

In fact many organisations with bases in these emerging markets are prime targets and seen as the ‘weak underbelly’ when it comes to an organisation’s cyber security.” Matu continues: “Cyber security still isn’t given enough priority by business leaders in the region as it’s often seen as an isolated IT problem and not a business issue.

It’s important that cyber security is demystified at that senior level. Rather than being perceived as this elusive dark art, cyber security needs to be incorporated into the whole business and not left isolated with the IT team. As the world of cyber criminality continues to evolve, it’s important that businesses continually review their IT security measures.

This should include an on-going review of the cyber threat landscape to understand what kinds of threats your business might face and adjusting your security measures accordingly - not forgetting making sure all employees are aware of the potential threats and how to respond.” • Source: APO (6/16)

 

Africa • SDG • 6/16

Corporate Citizens Need to Make a Real Impact on Africa’s Sustainable Development Goals

The roll-out of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) comes with a “leave no one behind” strategy that moves from reducing to ending poverty, and one that puts sustainability and growth at its core, believes Abey Tau, Public Affairs and Corporate Citizenship Manager for Samsung Electronics Africa.

Prepared to follow on from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), the 17 Sustainable Development Goals were unveiled with the aim of taking steps towards building a better world in the next 15 years. This is no easy target. The UN has spent significant time analysing the successes and failings of the MDGs in order to apply the learnings to the SDGs.

The MDGs did produce some good outcomes, such as contributing to decreasing the proportion of people living on less than $1.25 from 47% in 1990 to 14% in 2015. However, it is also acknowledged that progress has been limited, with many being left behind. According to reports, the SDG strategy will require an annual outlay of $2.5 trillion for it to be implemented successfully, which will need to come from private investment.

It’s certainly something the private sector wants to get involved with in an effort to show support for sustainable development. The SDGs hone in on growth as the main solution to poverty, but we are still in a position where most of the global GDP growth remains in the upper echelons of society, rather than having an impact on the poor.

The amount of growth needed to truly end poverty would also have a significant impact on environmental issues such as climate change. So this leaves the corporate sector, called on to make the investment needed to achieve these goals, in a tricky situation. Where do we invest to ensure we aren’t encouraging one area of growth at the expense of another?

Corporate investors play such a central role in the roll-out of the SDGs, and there’s a lot of work that needs to be done when it comes to our specific commitments and accountability mechanisms. With this framework, Samsung’s aim is to make a positive contribution towards the SDGs by positively impacting the lives of people. The company continues to inspire the world and create the future through innovative technology that enriches people’s lives and contribute to social growth.

We see ourselves as an active participant in the global agenda to help promote positive change by using our global network of employees, suppliers and partners; which is why we have established solutions which help address the felt need of communities, particularly in education, health, skills and employability.

In 2015, we have established Digital Villages in various countries in Africa including Sudan, Democratic Republic of Congo, Gabon and Senegal to mention a few. Designed in collaboration with African communities, the Digital Village concept comprises of mobile, solar-powered facilities including a connected admin centre, solar powered internet school, solar powered generator and solar power mobile health centre, which can be configured to serve as the high-tech hub of rural and underserved communities.

In addition to delivering desperately-needed services to communities, the Digital Village also delivers WiFi access and power to the broader community, often for the first time. This access sparks small business development and information-sharing, e-government service delivery and agricultural progress in areas that have been sidelined in the information age for too long. It makes sense to get behind the SDGs because they are a mechanism to help end poverty and promote sustainability across the board.

It may be Corporate Citizenship that kick starts the process, but it is essential that every individual is working towards a common goal. There is no doubt that the SDGs will, in one way or another, shape the global agenda on economic, social and environmental development over the next 15 years. It is also true that global action is the best way to ensure accountability and inclusivity. Ultimately the call is for everyone from government, to the private sector and civil society to play their part in creating a sustainable future. • Source: APO (6/16)

 


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UEMOA countries - Profiles

Benin

benin
Full name: The Republic of Benin
Population: 9 million (UN, 2007)
Capital: Porto-Novo
Other cities: Cotonou
Area: 112,622 sq km (43,484 sq miles)
Major languages: French (official) , Fon, Ge, Bariba, Yoruba, Dendi
Major religions: Indigenous beliefs, Christianity, Islam
Life expectancy: 56 years (men), 58 years (women) (UN)
Monetary unit: 1 CFA (Communauté Financière Africaine) franc = 100 centimes
Main exports: Cotton, palm oil
GNI per capita: US $510 (World Bank, 2006)
Internet domain: .bj
International dialling code: +229

Burkina Faso

burkinaFull name: Burkina Faso
Population: 14.8 million (UN, 2007)
Capital: Ouagadougou
Other cities: Bobo-Dioulasso
Area: 274,200 sq km (105,870 sq miles)
Major languages: French, indigenous languages
Major religions: Indigenous beliefs, Islam, Christianity
Life expectancy: 51 years (men), 54 years (women) (UN)
Monetary unit: 1 CFA (Communaute Financiere Africaine) franc = 100 centimes
Main exports: Cotton, animal products, gold
GNI per capita: US $400 (World Bank, 2006)
Internet domain: .bf
International dialling code: +226

Ivory Coast

 ivoireFull name: The Republic of Ivory Coast
Population: 19.3 million (UN, 2007)
Capital: Yamoussoukro
Other cities: Abidjan (economic cap.), Bouaké, Man-Danané
Area: 322,462 sq km (124,503 sq miles)
Major languages: French, indigenous languages
Major religions: Islam, Christianity, and indigenous beliefs
Life expectancy: 48 years (men), 49 years (women) (UN)
Monetary unit: 1 CFA (Communaute Financiere Africaine) franc = 100 centimes
Main exports: Cocoa, coffee, tropical woods, petroleum, cotton, bananas, pineapples, palm oil, fish
GNI per capita: US $840 (World Bank, 2006)
Internet domain: .ci
International dialling code: +225

Guinea-Bissau

bissauFull name: The Republic of Guinea-Bissau
Population: 1.7 million (UN, 2007)
Capital: Bissau
Area: 36,125 sq km (13,948 sq miles)
Major languages: Portuguese, Crioulo, African languages
Major religions: Indigenous beliefs, Islam, Christianity Life expectancy: 45 years (men), 48 years (women) (UN)
Monetary unit: 1 CFA (Communaute Financiere Africaine) = 100 centimes
Main exports: Cashew nuts, shrimp, peanuts, palm kernels, sawn timber
GNI per capita: US $180 (World Bank, 2006)
Internet domain: .gw
International dialling code: +245

Mali

maliFull name: The Republic of Mali
Population: 12.3 million (UN, 2007)
Capital: Bamako
Other cities: Timbuktu, Ségou, Mopti, Sikasso, Kayes, Gao
Area: 1.25 million sq km (482,077 sq miles)
Major languages: French, Bambara, Berber, Arabic
Major religions: Islam, indigenous beliefs
Life expectancy: 52 years (men), 57 years (women) (UN)
Monetary unit: 1 CFA (Communaute Financiere Africaine) franc = 100 centimes
Main exports: Cotton, gold, livestock
GNI per capita: US $380 (World Bank, 2006)
Internet domain: .ml
International dialling code: +223

Niger

nigerFull name: The Republic of Niger
Population: 14.2 million (UN, 2007)
Capital: Niamey
Other cities: Zinder
Area: 1.27 million sq km (489,000 sq miles)
Major languages: French (official), Arabic, Hausa, Songhai
Major religions: Islam, indigenous beliefs
Life expectancy: 58 years (men), 56 years (women) (UN)
Monetary unit: 1 CFA (Communaute Financiere Africaine) franc = 100 centimes
Main exports: Uranium, livestock products
GNI per capita: US $240 (World Bank, 2006)
Internet domain: .ne
International dialling code: +227

Senegal

senegalFull name: Republic of Senegal
Population: 12.4 million (UN, 2007)
Capital: Dakar
Other cities: Thies, Kaolack
Area: 196,722 sq km (75,955 sq miles)
Major language: French (official), Wolof
Major religion: Islam
Life expectancy: 61 years (men), 65 years (women) (UN)
Monetary unit: 1 CFA (Communaute Financiere Africaine) franc = 100 centimes
Main exports: Fish, peanuts, petroleum products, phosphates, cotton
GNI per capita: US $710 (World Bank, 2006)
Internet domain: .sn
International dialling code: +221


Togo

togoFull name: Togolese Republic
Population: 6.6 million (UN, 2007)
Capital: Lomé
Area: 56,785 sq km (21,925 sq miles)
Major languages: French (official), local languages
Major religions: Indigenous beliefs, Christianity, Islam
Life expectancy: 57 years (men), 60 years (women) (UN)
Monetary unit: 1 CFA (Communaute Financiere Africaine) franc = 100 centimes
Main exports: Cocoa, phosphates, coffee, cotton
GNI per capita: US $350 (World Bank, 2006)
Internet domain: .tg
International dialling code: +228



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